Teachers should not be allowed to monitor a students social networking account

Once children who have lived with having Facebook in their lives everyday become the people making the decisions it will be allowed in school. What I think has to happen, are safeguards put into place so that there is less opportunity for teachers to fall into inappropriate relationships with students.

Teachers should not be allowed to monitor a students social networking account

Students, teachers and social networking – Schools of Thought - arteensevilla.com Blogs

At the center of this recent interest is Glendale Unified School District, which is located in Southern California and has a middle and high school student population of about 14, The company states that it actively looks for anything online that could threaten the safety and well-being of students in the district, including cyberbullying and threats of self-harm.

These could be posts that are initiated from school, or not; using school-owned technology, or not. The technology also allows for the flagging and reporting of drug use or class-cutting — or really anything publicly posted by a student that could be viewed as problematic to the school.

Teachers should not be allowed to monitor a students social networking account

That said, the question remains: Parental Monitoring Most people would agree that parents have a responsibility to keep tabs on what their kids are doing online. This is a tough issue. On the one hand, I am not in a position to tell anyone how to parent their kids.

So when responding to this question, I simply explain the potential consequences of going this route. If a parent chooses to surreptitiously monitor the online activities of their kids, eventually they will find something that they will have to confront their child about.

When they do, and their child finds out that the parent had been spying on them, it will be extremely difficult to repair the harm done as it relates to encouraging an open and trusting relationship in the future.

In general, if a parent thinks it is necessary to take such a step, then I advise them to make their children aware of it. Parents should tell them why they are installing the software and explain that the primary goal is to protect them.

Finally, parents should use this as an opportunity to encourage responsible use by telling their children that as they demonstrate safe and appropriate behaviors online over time, they will gradually earn more privacy.

This can be a very effective strategy for early Internet users who are still learning how to navigate the World Wide Web safely.

A concern I have is that some parents may fall into a false sense of security when they hear that the school is paying someone to watch over what their kids are doing online and therefore not take the time to do it themselves.

The reality of course is that if a child wants to circumvent tracking and monitoring software, it is pretty easy to do. The point is, if you push too hard, teens will go underground which will make it even more difficult to keep up.

And finally, research has cast doubt on the effectiveness of monitoring and blocking software in preventing experiences with cyberbullying. I am not particularly convinced of that. Most students I speak with are savvy enough to realize that what they post in public spaces online is open for anyone to see.

And they know that schools are looking. Counselors, principals, and school resource officers have been looking for years. The only thing new about this is that a school is contracting with a third party to do the looking.

And this was not a survey of students where we asked them to report what they were doing. We randomly selected profiles to carefully review to see how much information was publicly visible. So very early on — over four years ago — students recognized the need to avoid having their profiles open for the whole world to see.

Furthermore, more and more teens are moving to ephemeral communication apps like Snapchat that make it more difficult to watch over and track what they are saying.

School Culture is What Matters Most From my perspective, schools along with parents, of course do have an obligation to keep track of what students are doing online.

Should teachers and students be friends of the Facebook variety? Social media boundaries: Should teachers and students be 'friends'? Stefani McNair has tried to think of a reason why her. Apr 09,  · Teachers, students and social media: Where is the line? Some teachers want to use Facebook and Twitter as teaching tools, yet concern for appropriate boundaries remain. There has been much discussion over the last few days about whether it is appropriate for schools to actively monitor the social media activities of students (I participated in a HuffPost Live discussion about this issue earlier today). At the center of this recent interest is Glendale Unified School District, which is located in Southern California and has a middle and high school student population of about 14,

What do they do at that moment? Are they empowered to take action themselves? Do students feel comfortable talking with an adult at school about what they witnessed or heard about? Do they feel that telling an adult at school or at home would resolve the situation?

There is also the added benefit in that by encouraging and empowering students to come forward with concerns, schools have many more people on the lookout for trouble and are able to access much more potentially problematic information since even private profiles not accessible to a 3rd party monitoring company are visible to at least some students.

According to the Youth Voice Projecta survey of nearly 12, students from 12 different U. If schools are able to respond to bullying and cyberbullying in a way that quickly stops the harassment without further harming or humiliating any of the parties involved, then students will feel much more comfortable going to them for help when problems arise in the future.

And the word will spread, encouraging others to also do so. As it is, many are afraid that the school, or their parents, will just make things worse. So the more important question for me is what do the educators do with the information once they receive it?

The company sends the school district a daily report of online chatter that might be important to investigate further. Who is responsible for investigating? Who decides whether something is serious enough to warrant additional scrutiny?

Additionally, are schools taking on additional liability by actively patrolling the Internet for problems?Recent incidents in states across the country have renewed questions about schools' authority to access and monitor students' personal social-media accounts.

The issue of social media and how far school districts should go is garnering national attention because of a monitoring program Huntsville City Schools started in May 02,  · The guidelines say, in general, that teachers should maintain separate professional and personal Web pages.

They may not e-mail, “friend” or otherwise communicate with students via the. The Glendale Unified School District has hired the company Geo Listening, a social network monitoring service, to communications for about 14, middle school and high school students.

The Glendale plan is one that may soon be coming to a school near you. The lowdown: Schools' access to students' social media. Should schools be allowed to monitor students’ personal social-media accounts?

Teachers should not be allowed to monitor a students social networking account

That’s a question lawmakers nationwide have debated as they try to balance efforts to crack down on cyberbullying with students’ right to privacy. Should teachers and students be friends of the Facebook variety? Social media boundaries: Should teachers and students be 'friends'?

Stefani McNair has tried to think of a reason why her.

Students, teachers and social networking – Schools of Thought - arteensevilla.com Blogs